NEWS

ニュース

Julie’s Corner(ジュリー寄稿欄)No. 2 November 2019

This month the focus is on revisiting our understanding of the definition of palliative care. Ensuring we have a good understanding of when to discuss palliative care will ensure that our patients wishes for end of life are more likely to occur. According to the Japan Health Ministry survey earlier this year only around 13.2% of people currently die at home. Compared to the 1950’s where 80% of people died at home.

(https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/backstories/547/)
We need to think about why these changes have occurred and our contribution to improving patients preferred place of death. I often talk about taking “baby steps”, we cannot change everyone’s practice overnight. However, we can think about our own practice and what may be the one thing that we can change that will make a difference for palliative care patients journeys in the health system. Put simply, palliative care is a focus on quality of life, ensuring peoples personal goals are achieved where possible, symptoms are managed to the best of our ability using best practice strategies, preventing unnecessary admissions to hospital and families and friends are well supported.

Palliative care philosophy is patient centred and holistic in approach using a multidisciplinary team where possible. Care of the dying is the final phase of palliative care. We can improve patient’s quality of life for months, if not years before they die, if we can better recognise when to commence discussions about palliative care. For this to occur we need to be comfortable about having these discussions and have a good knowledge of what palliative care has to offer. There is an opportunity to present palliative care as a positive outcome for patients, that is we are focussing on their quality of life, preventing unnecessary admissions to hospital, we will ensure their symptoms are well controlled, supporting family and friends, and we can work together on helping the patient and their family achieve their personal goals important to them.
We need to remind ourselves palliative care is not limited to patients with a cancer diagnosis but also for patients diagnosed with Dementia, Heart disease, COPD, Parkinson’s disease and many other chronic conditions. The deciding time is when the patient is starting to talk to you or hinting they are considering areas such as quality of life, poor symptom control, not wanting to come back to hospital, treatment fatigue. All of these triggers are an opportunity to have a discussion within the patients’ health care team and with the patient and their families. Our very important role as patient advocates is to ensure we do not miss the opportunity to have these discussions with patients to explore this further with them.
Here are a few links that may assist your reflections in this area:
– WHO definition of palliative care https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/palliative-care
– UK Gold Standards Proactive Identification Guidance – 6th edition 2016 – excellent guide in assisting earlier identification of patients leading to more proactive care and prediction of needs, and away from challenges of specific clinical prognostication tools that can sometimes hamper this approach. http://www.goldstandardsframework.org.uk/pig
If you have any particular areas you would like additional information on please forward your request to julie@palliativeeducation.com and we will ensure that this is discussed. Please let me know how you are going as we would enjoy sharing your thoughts and experiences on palliative care so that we can continue to learn from each other.
I am looking forward to our next month’s catch up. Take care Julie

Julie’s Corner: No. 2 NOV/2019   <日本語版>
日本語版監修:木下佳代子 ジェックス参与

今月の主題は、緩和ケアの定義の理解について再度考えてみたいと思います。緩和ケアについての話し合いをいつの時点で始めるのが良いかについてよく理解していることが患者さんたちの希望する終末のありようを実現することに繋がります。今年の早い時期に実施された日本の厚生労働省によるアンケート調査では、わずか13.2%の人が自宅で死を迎えたのに対して1950年代では、80%が自宅で最後を迎えました。なぜこのような変化が生じたかについて、そして患者にとって希望する最後を迎える場所を確保することに協力できることについて考える必要があります。私はよく「ベビーステップ(赤子の歩み)」の話をします。一人ひとりの行動を一晩で変えることはできません。しかし、自分の行動を見直してみて、医療制度の中での緩和ケア患者としての旅路の上にひとつの違いをもたらす変化について考えることはできます。簡単に言えば、緩和ケアは、生活の質に焦点を当てること、患者の個人的な望みが可能な限り実現されること、最善の実践方法を用いることにより症状が和らげられ、不必要な入院を避けたり、そして、家族や友人達にサポートの手を差し伸べることなどです。

緩和ケアの哲学は、患者中心であり可能な限り多くの専門分野のチームによる総合的な手法をとりいれること。死に至るケアは、緩和ケアの最終段階です。緩和ケアについての話し合いをいつから始めるかについての理解を深めることができれば、亡くなる前の数年でなくても数か月の間でもQOLを向上させることができます。そのためには、そのような話し合いをする機会を躊躇することなく見極め、また、緩和ケアが提供できることについての充分な知識を持っていることが大切です。緩和ケアは患者さんにとって、前向きな成果として提示する機会であります—すなわち、生活の質向上に焦点を当てたものであり、病院への不必要な入院を避けるとか、症状が手厚く管理されているとか、家族や友人達もサポートを受けられるなど患者と家族が大切な目標(ゴール)を目指せるように私共は協力し合うことができます。

緩和ケアは、がんと診断された患者に限られないこと、そして、認知症、心臓病、COPD、パーキンソン病、他の慢性疾患がある患者にも適用されるものであることを忘れてはなりません。緩和ケアを話し合うタイミングとは、患者が生活の質(QOL)について、症状が思わしくない、病院に戻りたくない、治療に疲れた等についてあなたと話がしたいと言い出した時、又は、それらしきことを考えているような様子が見えるときです。これらのきっかけこそ患者の医療チーム内で、また、患者とその家族との話し合いを始めるタイミングです。患者の擁護者としての私たちの大切な役割は、患者との話し合いの機会を失わないということにつきます。

この分野での参考となるリンクをお知らせします:
・WHO緩和ケア定義:https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/palliative-care
・英国ゴールドスタンダードフレームワーク:http://www.goldstandardsframework.org.uk/pig
患者がより積極的な治療を望んでいるとか必要としていることの予測を早い段階で察知するためのガイドライン他。

皆さんがこういう分野で追加情報が欲しい等のご希望があれば、次のジュリーのアドレスまでメールを送ってください:julie@palliativeeducation.com(英語でなくても日本語でOKです)必ず取り上げさせていただきます。このシリーズについての感想、ご意見などございましたら是非聞かせてください。皆様の緩和ケアについての経験やお考えからお互いに学び合えることを願っています。

では、次号にてお目にかかれることを楽しみにしています。ご機嫌よう ジュリー

Scroll Up